News, Politics & Democracy

Media AND Information Literacy Part 1

This issue highlights the close relationship of the fields of media literacy and information literacy. Although media literacy and information literacy are two separate fields of practice and research, the intersections and the overlaps between the fields continue to strengthen and grow as both fields evolve. UNESCO has long encouraged both fields to align and work together through support of its Media and Information Literacy (MIL) program, and has sponsored meetings and declarations, conferences and events that focus on the combined fields.

Citizenship in the Digital Age Part 2

This issue continues our discussion of the power shift in the media ecosystem, and what it means to be a citizen in a digital age. CML interviewed two digital literacy advocates – Kimberly Brodie, Founder/CEO of The Digital Peace Project, and Alan Simpson from iKeepSafe. 

CML is sad to inform our readers of the death of Elizabeth Thoman. Thoman was a pioneer and visionary who founded the Center for Media Literacy in 1989.  

Citizenship in the Digital Age

This issue focuses on the 2016 presidential election, where technology is going and the challenges that we face in teaching about it. CML interviewed two media literacy advocates – Stephen Balkam from Family Online Safety Institute and Tara O’Gorman, a teacher from a media literacy magnet school in New York. Also includes resources and MediaLit Moments Activity on Fake News. This is Part 1 of a series on Citizenship in the Digital Age.

Documentary Film and Media Literacy

In this issue of Connections, we discuss the art and craft of documentary, a genre which utilizes techniques that differ widely from fiction film, including investigation and presentation of evidence, interviews, moral inquiry, calls to action, presentation of human relationships for emotional impact, and much more.   The MediaLit Moments activity is He Named Me Malala. The activity uses the 2015 documentary of the same name.

Media Literacy and Human Rights

The constructed nature of media is highly visible in examples of human rights coverage – from genocide to disabilities to incidents of civic rights violations.  CML offers diverse examples of construction at work.  This issue also includes highlights from the first US Media Literacy Week as well as an interview with Robert Ferguson about his work with Roma populations in the UK.

 

The U.S. Department of Education

In March 2008, the US Department of Education’s Office of Educational Technology convened an information session on media literacy that was open to all department employees.  Kimberly Brodie, Special Assistant in the Office of Educational Technology, led the discussion.  Tessa Jolls of the Consortium was an invited speaker, as well as Doug Levin of Cable in the Classroom, the U.S. cable industry’s education foundation.

Responding to Racism and Stereotypes

In this issue of Connections, we examine the ways in which stereotypes and prejudice surface in media, and discuss ways in which media literate citizens can become agents for positive social change. We explore dehumanizing representations of the Other.  In our second article, we investigate the connections between use of stereotypes in television news and the social capital of communities.  

Reality TV and Media Literacy

In our research section, we reveal how reality television producers mine the emotions, bodies and identities of cast members for spectacle and profit.  In our second article, we excavate the values and beliefs embedded in reality television with a close examination of American talent and makeover shows.  We also discuss lifestyle television as a laboratory for the development of democratic citizenship skills. The University of Rhode Island held a symposium on the Historical Roots of Media Literacy Education, and the Elizabeth Thoman Media Literacy Archive was unveiled.   

Propaganda and Media Literacy

In our first article, two prominent rhetoricians explain the differences between propaganda and persuasive discourse that stimulates engaged citizenship. Next, we review the premise of Edward Herman and Noam Chomsky's landmark Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media, and, with some assistance from media literacy scholar Renee Hobbs, we discuss responses to forms of propaganda which are more pervasive and indirect.

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